Whenever we think about who we are and what defines us, we generally drift towards ideas about personalities and the combination of different characteristics and qualities that form ours.

 

Personality types have actually been quite a hot topic as of late, with many people taking personality tests to try and figure out which personality category they fall under.

 

One test commonly used is the DISC behavior assessment tool, used to analyse why different people behave differently.

 

It is based on the DISC theory by psychologist William Moulton Marston. The assessment tool centres on four main personality traits: Dominance (D), Influence (I), Steadiness (S) and Conscientiousness (C).

 

With DISC, we are able to better predict our behavior in terms of how we live our lives and how we deal with others. Understanding what motivates you, what causes you stress and how you solve problems, will come in very useful especially as you work with people in the future and can help to improve your working relations.

 

For example, you might realize through DISC that you are a more task-oriented person, thus you might find it difficult to work with people who are more people-oriented and will need to make adjustments in order to improve working relations. With a better understanding of ourselves, we will also be better able to tap on our strengths and work on our weaknesses.

 

Definitely who we are cannot be wholly encapsulated by one personality type. We are all made up of a blend of personality types, where we range higher on some scales and lower on others. We look at our more dominant ones to understand ourselves better and the blends typically come in the form of D/I, S/C, I/S or D/C.

 

Take a look at the table below for a breakdown of the the different DISC personality types!

Personality type Behaviour Strengths Weaknesses What they want from their role How to improve
High D –  Dominance Determined

 

Opinionated

Direct

 

Egocentric

 

Decisive

 

Demanding

 

 

Problem solver

 

Visionary

 

Independent

 

Self-sufficient

 

Thrives in crises

 

Strong willed

Tendency to be overbearing

 

Rash in making decisions

 

Impatient with poor performance

 

Not very encouraging

Power and authority

 

Prestige

 

Challenge

Be strong willed is good because you won’t give up even when things get tough. However, it is important to know where the boundaries are and when you need to submit to authority. You may not always be right.
High I –

Influence

Can be emotional

 

Persuasive

 

Talks more than listens

 

Animated

 

Outgoing

 

Enthusiastic

Friendly

 

Interest in people

 

Convincing

 

Charismatic

 

Life of the party

More concerned with popularity than tangible results

 

Poor with detail

 

Short attention Span

 

Disorganised

 

More talk than action

 

Makes decisions based on emotions

Visible recognition

 

Approval

 

Popularity

Important to recognize that you thrive when attention is given to you and your ideas are heard, and to bank on that. You work well under pressure and are able to use your influence for good and the betterment of the situation. However it is also important to know that when people are not receptive of your ideas, it doesn’t have to do with who you are as a person. Rejection of your ideas do not equate to rejection of you as a person.
High S –

Steadiness

Stable and steady

 

Consultative

 

Patient

 

Dislike change

 

Reserved

 

Sympathetic

Good listener

 

Compassionate

 

Understanding

 

Patient

 

Predictable

Resists change

 

Holds grudges

 

Spectator

 

Too laid back

 

Indecisive

 

Not goal-oriented

 

Difficulty in establishing priorities

Standardization

 

Security

 

Calm environments

 

Status quo

Do not fear change and conflict. Change and conflict can be scary, but may be necessary.

 

Don’t be afraid to fight for what you want (as long as it isn’t illegal or won’t lead to a physical fight).

 

Change can also be good sometimes. After all, growth occurs outside of your comfort zone.

High C -Conscientiousness Adhere strongly to rules

 

Structured

 

Logical

 

Careful

 

Cautious

 

Diplomatic

 

Proper

 

Hardworking

Competent

 

Analytical

 

Precise

 

Self-disciplined

 

Loyal

Meticulous to a fault

 

Rigid

 

Critical

 

Legalistic

 

Not expressive

 

Unforgiving

Clear expectations

 

Autonomy

 

Recognition of expertise

 

Professionalism

Don’t be afraid of criticism, and instead, embrace it and grow. There isn’t a need to take everything so seriously, sometimes it’s okay to just relax.

 

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